A Rebel without a cause… Semiramis

I would like to propose a Radical Idea. What if… “The Rebel” as referenced in the Bible was not a man but a woman? What if it was a daughter of Cush, which rebelled against YHWH and the norms of society?

Let’s take a look at the history of this Rebel Nimrod.

In the Hebrew text it says:
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I confess I don’t know anything of Hebrew grammer but what if ‘he’ was ‘she’ with male characteristics.

If “The Rebel;” was a daughter of Cush and we compare the lifespans of the 3rd generation after the flood, we see that she could easily have lived up to 430 years. This is comparable with Shem’s son Arphaxad. A lot can be accomplished in such a long time.  This could explain many of the similarities and differences in the ancient beliefs about this specific ‘goddess’.

The pattern of development of the legend of Semiramis is known as ‘naru literature’, where a story was told, and re-told, and grew greater until, finally, the actual events were forgotten and only the myth remains. This style of literacy was already known in 2000 BC.

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As Noah and his family left the Ark, they immediately became “fruitfull, and multiplied”. Within a few hundred yeas, the families living together were large, and possibly had differences of opponion, as families do. Japhet seems to have taken his family and moved away first, into Europe and Russia.  As early as 400 years after the flood, the fertile crescent in Mesopotamia, the Nile area, Ethiopia, Arabia and Iran had already been settled by a variety of family groups. Most nomads moving from place to place, but some building rudimentary villages to live in. The majority of people still lived in the Sumer area.

Cush occupied Sumer /Shinar* around 2400 BC after the flood. Sumer is widely known as the “Land of seven cities” as they were the first cities built after the flood. The very first city being Erech (Uruk) , named after the city  tht Tubal-Cain ruled before the flood. Tubal-Cain was the father of Noah’s wife.

The land of Shinar was possibly named after a woman called Sammur-amat, meaning “Gift of the Sea”. Sammur in Hebrew means Shinar.

 

She must have been a “man-eater”. Her sexual prowess giving her power over those she ‘hunted’. Thus “ A mighty hunter of men”.  Semiramus lived in Erech (Uruk) – in Shinar.

Linking Sammur-amat with Semiramis

Linking Semiramis to Inanna

Inanna is the ancient Sumerian goddess of love, procreation, and of war who later, became identified with the Akkadian goddess Ishtar, and further with the Phoenician Astarte and the Greek Aphrodite, among others. Inanna was always portrayed as a young woman, never as a mother or wife. She also had a Lion as companion as well as wearing the armor of a man.  Inanna is an independent woman who does as she pleases, quite often without regard for consequences, and either manipulates, threatens, or tries to seduce others to fix the difficulties her behaviour creates.

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Inanna wInanna is the ancient Sumerian goddess of love, procreation, and of war who later, became identified with the Akkadian goddess Ishtar, and further with the Phoenician Astarte and the Greek Aphrodite, among others. Inanna was always portrayed as a young woman, never as a mother or wife. She also had a Lion as companion as well as wearing the armor of a man.  Inanna is an independent woman who does as she pleases, quite often without regard for consequences, and either manipulates, threatens, or tries to seduce others to fix the difficulties her behaviour creates.as associated with the city of Uruk. The famous Uruk Vase (found in a deposit of cult objects of the Uruk III period) depicts a row of naked men carrying various objects, bowls, vessels, and baskets of farm products, and bringing sheep and goats, to a female figure facing the ruler.

Inanna has a central role in the myth of Enmerkar and the Lord of Aratta. A major theme in the narrative is the rivalry between the rulers of Aratta and Uruk for the heart of Inanna. Ultimately, this rivalry results in natural resources coming to Uruk and the invention of writing.

Linking Inanna to Ishtar

Through the work of the Akkadian poet and high priestess, Enheduanna (2285-2250 BCE) daughter of Sargon of Akkad (who conquered Mesopotamia and built the great Akkadian Empire) Inanna was carefully identified with Ishtar and rose in prominence from a local vegetative deity of the Sumerian people to the Queen of Heaven and the most popular goddess in all of Mesopotamia.

“The Sumerian word for owl is ninna and the name Nin-ninna given to the goddess in her owl form meant ‘Divine Lady Owl’. The ancient texts also give the Akkadian word kilili for Nin-ninna, and this name was one shared by Innana and Ishtar. Perhaps kilili is the original derivation of Lilith, who, much later, in biblical times, is called ‘night-owl or screech-owl’.”

Patai asserts that Ishtar is the direct descendent of the Sumerian Innana. The Babylonian Ishtar emphasizes the promiscuity of a divine harlot rather than the virginal queenship of Innana. So much so that when Ishtar descended to the Nether world (an Akkadian myth parallel to the Descent of Innana), “neither man nor beast copulated; when she emerged, all of them were again seized by sexual desire.”

At least one stele (Wolkstein and Kramer 1983, pg 9) shows Nanna the Moon god presenting the rod and and ring to Ur-Nammu, a Sumerian King (Third Dynasty of Ur, c. 2050-1950 B.C.), and the ring is clearly attached to a long, loosely looped line and the tapered rod appears to be about one meter long in comparison to the human figures.
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Link Onnes and Ninus to Semiramis

Semiramis was taken home by a farmer named Simmas, while she was just an infant of one year old, abandoned at a lake. He called her Semiramis which seems to mean “doves”.She grew into a beautiful young woman who was as widely known for her intelligence and grace as for her appearance. One day, the governor of Syria, a man named Onnes, visited the farm, saw her, and fell in love with her. He asked Simmas for her hand in marriage and it was granted.

 “And since the other qualities of Semiramis were in keeping with the beauty of her countenance, it turned out that her husband became completely enslaved by her, and since he would do nothing without her advice he prospered in everything”  Diodorus

Onnes advanced his career and position at court through taking the advice of his wife until he was among the king’s most trusted counselors.

At this point the king, Ninus, initiated a military campaign against Bactriana and took every city by storm except the one he wanted most: Bactra. He laid siege to the city, but the defenses were so strong that he could not prevail against it. After the siege had gone on for some time, Onnes thought to consult with Semiramis on the problem and see if she could find a solution

Link Enmerkar and Dumuzi to Semiramis/Inanna

Nimrod begins his kingdom in Babel, Erech, Akkad and Calneh.

Linking Ashur and Sargon to Semiramis/Inanna

Ashur built Nineveh, Resen, Rehoboth and Calah.
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Ninsun was the mother of Gilgamesh, an extremely devoted mother.  Ishtar, the goddess of love and war, only has a small, yet devastating role in the Epic of Gilgamesh. She basically lets all fire and brimstone loose, which leads to a clash with Enkidu and Gilgamesh, which in turn leads to Enkidu getting the death penalty from the gods, which in turn sends Gilgamesh off on his failed quest for immortality.

 

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